Category Archives: Sanitation

Using LFTR to Clean Water, Cure Cancer, & Produce Energy

The Amazon product for this Thor’s-day, the 22nd (pulled the trigger early), which is usually Thirst-day around here, is a book that caused a stir in the environmentalist movement when it appeared, Whole Earth Discipline: Why Dense Cities, Nuclear Power, Transgenic Crops, RestoredWildlands, and Geoengineering Are Necessary.

This talk at the Long Now Foundation, Re-Thinking Green (MP3) describes some of the controversial positions advocated by the author and Whole Earth creator, Stewart Brand.

In English, Thursday actually originates with Thor’s Day.

Says Wikipedia, “The name is derived from Old English Þūnresdæg and Middle English Thuresday (with loss of -n-, first in northern dialects, from influence of Old Norse Þorsdagr) meaning “Thor’s Day”.It was named after the Norse god of Thunder.”

This Thor’s-day we’re looking at Thorium as the solution to several problems.


Might Thorium Humor Poster

Rusty Towell, if that is his real name, gave a sobering talk at TEDxACU about the conditions of life for impoverished third world people you’d expect from a Christian missionary man, except he also makes a compelling case for the safe use of Thorium nuclear energy to make power, clean water, and cure cancer.

See Why making energy from dirt might save the world | Rusty Towell | TEDxACU, also embedded below.

Buckets of Life of Death

Wikipedia:CambridgeBayWeather
A Modern Honey Bucket.
I heard about food grade storage buckets and alcohol fermentation and distillation in buckets on The Survival Podcast, and got to thinking about The Bucket List after a recent memorial service.

You can kick the can down the road and achieve eternal youth, but not if you mistakenly kick the bucket.

Then I thought about how many of life’s needs can be met by the use of buckets until the final kick-off, including personal waste as reported in this Anchorage Daily News story, “Honey buckets remain a sanitation concern in Bethel.”

I found that story from Bethel, Alaska by chance. One resident, Tim Meyers, grows fresh vegetables in the permafrost there, and according to Mark Dowie, using heat from composting in a greenhouse. More info is linked from my post at PermaKent, “Better Than The Best Idea.”

The Meyers Farm website tells the story and has a link to an audio interview on the Press page.

Rainwater can be captured in buckets, and plants grown in them when full of soil and allowing for drainage.

There are even “bucketponics” combinations of fish and plants able to feed the fish and the fish in return able to feed and fertilize the plants. Only sun and water agitation and filtration might be needed to keep the system going. And perhaps some added compost as fish and plants are consumed.

Buckets might catch the wind or serve as part of a water wheel generator. A bucket brigade can deliver a steady amount of water if no hose or pressure is available to fight a fire.

Other writers on the web have explored the multiple uses of the typical 5-gallon bucket, including Wikipedia, “Buckets–Types and Uses.”

Other uses include as a musical instrument, seat, and trash can.